An asado can eventually be compared to what is known as a ‘BBQ’ … however, it is so much more. An asado is a tradition among Argentine people, see sequence of pictures below. The meat is cooked in its purest minimalistic form – just burning charcoal and meat. It is a social event with utmost importance that can last all day long!

The person that starts the asado is known as the asador and he or she starts by lighting the stack of wood, which sits on top of a heap of charcoal on the left hand side of the parrilla (a cast-iron grill which can be adjusted to different height levels, closer or farthest from the heat).

Once the grill is warm, scrub it down with some newspaper to clean the grease away. When the flames have calmed down, a pile of glowing charcoal on the left of your grill will be ready, which you can then spread across evenly on the grill floor.

Then the cuts of meat are placed over the cast-iron grill, starting with the biggest cuts which will take longer to cook. An important secret is to take out the meat from the fridge well in advance (till room temperature), and salt it before placing it on the hot grill. In Argentina, we calculate a maximum of 500g of meat per adult.

A very important tip is to cook the meat very -but very- slowly using low fire. A typical cooking time is around one to two hours. Do you want to know more details on how to make the best “asado”?

01 Picada


A typical Argentinian asado starts with a “picada” which consists on several small dishes usually presented on a wooden board. Olives, cheese, dry meats, bread, and peanuts are some of the key players of a typical picada.

02 Empanadas


Before the asado is ready, as a starter you can enjoy empanadas. Empanadas are savory pastries stuffed with either beef or ham and cheese, or corn, or vegetables. However, beef empanadas are the most popular starters for an asado.picada.

 

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03 Chorizo / Choripan


A typical Argentinian asado starts with a “picada” which consists on several small dishes usually presented on a wooden board. Olives, cheese, dry meats, bread, and peanuts are some of the key players of a typical picada.

04 Chimichuri


This sauce is a very special ingredient of every Argentine asado. Chimichurri is prepared with finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, and red wine vinegar. You can add it to the choripan, the meat, and even the empanadas!

 

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05 Meat


The meat is the essential main course of the asado. A good asador carefully looks after the asado and serves the pieces of meat accordingly to the guests’ taste. Argentinians usually eat medium or well-done meat, but the asador should also have rare/medium-rare for those who prefer bloody meat.

 

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06 Salad


Meat is usually accompanied with a mixed salad or “Ensalada mixta” which is basically lettuce, tomato and onion – or “Ensalada de papas” which consists of boiled potato cut into cubes, boiled eggs and mayonnaise dressing.

 

07 Wine


Asado must be accompanied by a good red wine. Malbec is the best type of wine to match with an Argentinian asado. If you prefer Cavernet Sauvignion, it is also a great option.

08 Friends / Family


Asado must be accompanied by a good red wine. Malbec is the best type of wine to match with an Argentinian asado. If you prefer Cavernet Sauvignion, it is also a great option.

Asado

A typical Argentinian asado starts with a “picada” which consists on several small dishes usually presented on a wooden board. Olives, cheese, dry meats, bread, and peanuts are some of the key players of a typical picada.

Asado

Before the asado is ready, as a starter you can enjoy empanadas. Empanadas are savory pastries stuffed with either beef or ham and cheese, or corn, or vegetables. However, beef empanadas are the most popular starters for an asado.picada.

Learn More

Asado

A typical Argentinian asado starts with a “picada” which consists on several small dishes usually presented on a wooden board. Olives, cheese, dry meats, bread, and peanuts are some of the key players of a typical picada.

Asado

This sauce is a very special ingredient of every Argentine asado. Chimichurri is prepared with finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, and red wine vinegar. You can add it to the choripan, the meat, and even the empanadas!

Learn More

Asado

The meat is the essential main course of the asado. A good asador carefully looks after the asado and serves the pieces of meat accordingly to the guests’ taste. Argentinians usually eat medium or well-done meat, but the asador should also have rare/medium-rare for those who prefer bloody meat.

Learn More

Asado

Meat is usually accompanied with a mixed salad or “Ensalada mixta” which is basically lettuce, tomato and onion – or “Ensalada de papas” which consists of boiled potato cut into cubes, boiled eggs and mayonnaise dressing.

Asado

Asado must be accompanied by a good red wine. Malbec is the best type of wine to match with an Argentinian asado. If you prefer Cavernet Sauvignion, it is also a great option.

Asado

 The family Sunday “asado” or the “asado” with friends are the most significant social events where Argentinians meet around a BBQ grill.